Changing Your Response to Change Equals Positive Results

For many people change is a not a welcome friend.  However, as times goes on you soon find out that life is always changing.  Very few things stay the same.  Example--millions have been knocked out of their so called "secure jobs" thrust into a tailspin. Yes, many changes occur whether we want them or not.  What about you? Are you a professional that recently lost your job after many years of expertise in your field?  Or, perhaps you are contemplating a change in careers because you are just unhappy with the present situation you find yourself in? How you respond to change in any of these situations could determine your future success and yes, even your happiness.

When it comes to change, please consider the following...

  • With regard to employment, most people are good at a number of things.  Just because you have picked one job over another, does not mean you can't do other types of work; and actually be good at it.  Consider embracing something new as an adventure.
  • You successfully adjust to change daily without even thinking about it.  Seasonal changes, traffic situations, unexpected phone calls, are just a few changes that alter the moment.  Bigger events requiring adjustments in your life may be just as easy adjusting to depending on your perception. Ride the change; don't buck every turn and twist.
  • Many changes can be reversed or just stopped if you really don't care for them.  Of course, caution is advised if it is something hard to reverse. Look before you leap. There are some changes that are permanent.
  • Give yourself ample time to accept the change in your life.  The average time according to research that a new behavior becomes a habit takes about 66 days (of course for some it may be less or more time). 
Life can be an adventure if you are willing to change and be flexible when needed.  Many opportunities are right at your doorstep, yes a foot away.  Remember, only a few tweaks here and there may make the difference.  Go for it my friend.

A great read, with a new approach on how to look at life, success, and happiness is the
book ... 
U Turn Your Life: 5 Simple Steps to Achieve Success ? Starting Now!

Save Hundreds of Dollars Streaming--Use Roku

Unemployed, under-employed, or just want one of the best deals around?  Of course you do.  There is a great way to save money and still get quality entertainment.  Start streaming.   What is streaming?   How much of a savings are you really talking about? Will I still have great entertainment? These are all fair questions.

In non-technical terms, streaming is basically compressed data that is transmitted to your television via a wireless internet connection and a streaming device. You will be able to see programs pertaining to exercise, food, news, music, education and thousands of movies and other topics of interest in the privacy of your own home. I personally use the Roku system and love it.  Depending on which Roku box or streaming stick you choose, you will get 1,000 + channels including many that are free. For a minimal monthly fee, you can also purchase additional channels such as Netflix and Hulu Plus. These stations also offer television episodes of some of your classical favorites. Some other channels give you the capability of purchasing or renting newly released movies without leaving your driveway.  Great feature in bad weather.

Unlike your cable bill that continues month after month, your purchase of the Roku is a one-time payment. Think of the hundreds of dollars you will save!  Of course, do not cancel your internet service.  Remember, the second item you need is a wireless internet connection.  If you don't have a wireless connection, it is easy to set up.  Your local internet provider can help you.  You will need your wireless username and password to set up the Roku box.  Don't worry it is easy...

There are other streaming devices on the market.  Our home purchased the basic Roku system a few years ago and have had many quality hours of entertainment for ourselves as well as my grandchildren. I forgot to mention the many children's stations and movies for the little ones. This alone is worth its purchase.

For further details and purchase, please follow the Roku link here or the link on the sidebar on this page.  You don't need to be a technical guru to set this up.  The instructions are as easy as 1, 2, and 3!
Have fun...






Making Money With a Small Business

Sending out an endless amount of resumes with no positive response can be discouraging.  In addition, the longer you are out of work, it may be increasingly harder to find profitable work.  However, have you ever considered starting your own small business?

Starting your own business does not have to be an elaborate and difficult achievement.  If you have the desire to make money and the courage to brave something new, you could be in for a great experience. Here are a few areas to consider in starting your own business:
  • Landscaping 
  • Cleaning (residential)
  • Pet Sitting/Dog Walking
  • Personal Shopper
  • Sewing
  • House Painting
  • Pressure Washing Houses or Buildings
  • Resume Writing
  • House Sitting
  • Laundry (include ironing)
  • Babysitting
  • Crafts for Sale
  • Car Washing
  • Window Washing
  • Snow Removal 
Now is time to tap into your inner and outer resources.  Get out of your comfort zone and try something new.  You may not make a bundle; however, every little extra you do make will help pay those never-ending bills.  

Here is a link to my kindle book on amazon, How to Start a Cleaning Business on a Poor Man's Budget Some of the steps for this small business can be applied to many other smaller-type businesses.  Since you may not currently be working at the job of your dreams, why not try working for yourself.  You may even come up with another idea for entrepreneurship.  Just go for it!

Unemployed--Don't Drop Your Roadside Assistance

Being unemployed or under-employed may cause you to necessarily cut corners in your budget.  However, do not hastily drop your towing or roadside assistance coverage.  Although your car may be running fine today, it could break down tomorrow.  As the money tightens, you may put off or get by with as little as possible in car repair. You may want to read the article "Sick Cars--Millions May Be on the Road" for some practical ways to address your maintenance needs. However, do not drop your towing or roadside assistance coverage.

I speak from experience.  My truck, which was over twenty years old, broke down three times this past winter.  I wasn't financially ready for a huge truck repair.  However, since I had recently purchased roadside assistance coverage, I was able to have my truck towed twice and jump-started once.  By the third time, I was in a better position financially to repair the truck.  Needless to say, the mechanic finally figured out the problem!

Some of you may have this service included with your auto insurance payment.  Others may pay a quarterly, semi-annual, or annual fee for coverage.  There is another route--purchasing coverage on a monthly-basis at a smaller premium amount, with no penalty for cancellation at any time.  By doing it this way, you have more money in your pocket for immediate needs.

I personally recommend Motor Club of America (an independent contractor).  They were professional, courteous, and quick considering the miserable weather conditions. So whatever you do, don't drop your coverage.  You never know where you'll be if or when your car may need help...








To Move or Not to Move for Work





If you have been unemployed for some time, you may have pondered moving out of your local area to find plausible work.  Perhaps "the grass looks greener on the other side."  Realistically though, each person must weigh out the pros and cons unique to their situation.  I have moved across country several times during this economic snag. Here are some things that I observed in my travels that may be helpful to you:
  • Check the Unemployment Rate - Take a look at the unemployment rate in the area you may move to.  If the rate is at the top of the list or higher than your present location, you may want to reconsider moving or checking out what skills or trades are actually hiring in the area. Local newspapers may give you an idea of what companies and the type of positions that are hiring.   U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Cost of Living - You definitely need to look at the cost of living factors in the new location. For instance, some areas of Florida have very high rent coupled with low wages.  I repeat, some areas.  You should do your homework.  Look at the real estate market in the area.  What are the homes valued at?  What are the rents?  What are the grocery prices ?  You get the picture.
  • Transportation - Does the city of your choice offer public transportation?  If not, how will you get around if your vehicle breaks down? Is it a rural area?  If your car needs repair, what kind of prices are the mechanics charging? All of this matters when it comes to gasoline prices and upkeep of your vehicle.  Also consider if your car insurance rates may change.
  • Medical Needs - You no doubt will need to find a new doctor and dentist.  Personal recommendations are always helpful; this may take a little time as you make new acquaintances.  However, if you have any special medical needs, you may want to consult the local hospitals and other medical agencies before moving.
  • Degree or Certification - Is your particular degree or certification honored by the state you are moving to?  If you want to use your credentials, this might be your first step in deciding to move or not. 
  • Flexibility - Are you a flexible person?  I don't mean physically!  Is it easy or hard for you to adjust or accept differences in surroundings, attitudes, cultures, or methods of doing things? No two places are exactly the same.  Is the area drastically different than what you are use to--or just slightly? 
  • Friendliness -  A friendly person will find it easier to meet  people and ask questions when needed.  How easy is it for you to talk to strangers? 
  • Relatives or Close Friends - Do you know anyone, family member or close friend, in this new location?  A relative or close friend can give you tips on where to eat and shop, what areas of town to avoid, and what social events take place, etc. 
This is just a short list of what I encountered in my moving across country several times.   There are many more things to consider before jumping the fence onto "supposed greener grass."  On the other hand, if you are a friendly, flexible, and a focused person, you may be in for the adventure of a lifetime.  Only you can make that decision.  Just make sure you do your homework and know that some sacrifices may be necessary.  If possible, visit the location you are considering, get a local newspaper to get a feel for things, and talk to as many people as possible.  Good fortune to you my friend.













    Use Your Tax Refund Wisely

    Some of you may qualify for a tax refund this year.  If you have been unemployed recently, why not take a small portion of your refund and give yourself a treat.   A spa treatment, local trip away from the daily grind, a new outfit, or a discounted flight to an exciting area you may be curious about.  Of course, the practical side of you will definitely want to save some of the refund, catch up on bills, or invest in something that will allow you to make money or market any new ideas you may have. 

    Keep your spirits up and enjoy doing something new--but don't blow all of the money.  As you know, it is a long year with many unknown bends and turns.  Do you have any money left from your refund?

    Thank You "Dr. Corsi" for the Real Truth


    For quite some time now, this blog has addressed the many long-term workers who have been excluded from the national unemployment rate.  Now Dr. Jerome R. Corsi, a graduate of Harvard, reveals in his latest article, Here's the Real Unemployment Rate, the real rate of unemployment that includes those workers who have dropped out of the workforce over the last four years.  The Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) includes those workers who have stopped looking for work and are still unemployed only for a one-year period; those past the first-year mark are not included in the stats.  Yes, that leaves a gaping hole.  How big?

    According to Dr. Corsi's article, the real unemployment rate should be almost 23%, not 7.8%.  Since the BLS has six levels of rates when comparing the unemployment numbers, it can be very confusing.  Thankfully, the economist John Williams who is responsible for figuring out this rate, has been able to come up with a more realistic figure.  What does that mean to you?

    A real reason to stop blaming yourself.  No doubt you have been discouraged and tried almost everything to get work.  Unlike other times that you may have been laid off work or lost your job in the past, you were able to quickly and smoothly transition into something else.  However, times are different!  John Williams, the economist quoted in Dr. Corsi's article, said our time is "at a level that rivals any other downturn of the post-Great Depression era.”  My dear friends, though, do not give up.  You may not get the kind of job you had or think you should have.  So what is so good about that?

    Alternative skills, creativity, and new priorities must be tapped into.  No doubt you have already begun the process.  There are opportunities out there.  In this economy you must think "outside the box" and be willing to do things you may not have considered doing before.  Who knows?  You may even find out that you actually like doing something different.  Whatever your circumstances, count your blessings.  Again, you may be tired of hearing that when you are struggling to pay bills. Whatever you do, do not give up hope.  YOU WILL SURVIVE THIS!   Follow this link,
    Recession and Depression--Coping Skills You May Need, for more suggestions in coping in today's economy.

    This blog contains other ideas you may want to look at in seeking work.  However, I would love to hear what ideas you have come up with in pursuing a new job and making money.  Feel free to share what has worked for you.